Back in Japan…

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Well I’m back in Japan, and I have to say life is here pretty good. Mix equal parts of on-piste skiing, backcountry skiing, soaking in onsen, studying Japanese, and hanging out at Pontaro izakaya, and you have the recipe for my current day-to-day. The amazing experience I had here in Shin-Akakura last year brought me back for another season. It was such a great place to study Japanese and ski that I had to come back again, but this time only until March. It’s really a great situation for learning Japanese – I spend a couple hours studying in Hotel Moc and Sachiko helps me with any questions, and, in the evening, I’m exposed to, let’s say, various and interesting conversations at the izakaya (セクシーエアプロンだから)。

I have to admit that last year I felt pretty lost in learning Japanese; however, this time things are really starting to click. Last year I was adamantly against learning any kanji because I thought it was such a big hurdle and wanted to focus on conversation instead of reading/writing. However, I started studying kanji again this past December, and now I really like it. The strange thing with kanji (the Chinese characters) is that there are multiple readings (pronunciations) for each character. For example, you can see a word written and not really know how to pronounce it, but since the kanji have meaning you can understand the meaning of the word. The opposite is true for English, if you see a word for the first time, you can pronounce it but have no idea what it means. Anyways, the point is you can’t really read much with just katakana and hiragana, so the veil of illiteracy is slowing coming off. And that’s a great thing.

Small story: last year when travelling with James, we were discussing the personality type that tends to talk only about themselves and doesn’t ask questions about you – this was a pet peeve of James’ while I asserted that all you had to do was start talking about yourself without any inquiry. So James made the point that when you learn a language, the first thing you learn to say is how are you? In Japanese, you say genki? which means roughly are you lively? And indeed, this is the first thing you learn in Japanese. However, Japanese people almost never say this. You ask someone if they’re lively if you haven’t seen them in a long time, but it really isn’t a replacement for how are you? In fact, June-chan spent a good few minutes making fun of me for speaking like a Japanese textbook because I asked him everyday if he was genki.

Anyways, up at the top is an ice sculpture of the characters 雪酒場 (snow alcohol place) and somehow I got into the local paper.

またね。

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